Game or Criminal Toolkit?

Essex Police’s Fraud Alert System Newsletter no.36

Essex Police are reminding residents that what appear to be innocent games posted on social media have the potential to allow criminals access to your personal data—ultimately
allowing them to get their hands on your money.

Local policing teams have recently identified an increase in Facebook posts encouraging
users to post their ‘Film Star Name’ using a pet’s name and mothers maiden name, or
asking questions such as what was number one in the charts when you were 10.
These seemingly harmless questions can provide criminals with lots of personal
information that can assist them with stealing your identity.

For example:
• What is your film star name?
First Pet and Mother’s Maiden Name
• What was number one in the charts when you were 10?
Allows criminals to work out your Date of Birth
• What car did you pass your driving test in?
Details of first car
• Describe the city you were born in with a clue?
Town of birth

All of these are potentially answers to bank account security questions.

Remember to Take Five before posting personal details on social media and make sure
to check your security settings so that your posts can only be seen by those who you
want to see them.

This information was provided via Essex Police’s Fraud Alert System Newsletter no.36

My Info? I Don’t Think So!

Essex Police’s Fraud Alert System Newsletter no. 35

Residents are reminded to keep their personal documents safe after a number of reports of scammers asking for copies of passports and driving licences. Essex Police have seen a recent trend in scammers requesting personal details which can be used to steal someone’s identity.

This has been linked to a number of different scams including:
• HMRC/National Insurance fraud where the criminal claims
they need your personal details to prevent prosecution or
reinstate your NI number.
• Computer software frauds where the criminal claims to be
from your internet provider. They take control of your
computer and say they need to take a photo of you and
your driving licence/passport to confirm your identity.

Requests for personal details should always be a red flag. You
should never provide this information unless you have
confirmed who you are dealing with.

To protect you information and your money, Take Five:
STOP – Taking a moment to stop and think before parting
with your money or information could keep you safe.
CHALLENGE – Could it be fake? It’s ok to reject, refuse or
ignore any requests. Only criminals will try to rush or panic
you.
PROTECT – If you have provided personal details to
someone over the phone and you now believe this to be a
scam, contact your bank, building society and credit card
company immediately and report it to Action Fraud at
www.actionfraud.police.uk or by calling 0300 123 2040.

This information was provided via Essex Police’s Fraud Alert Newsletter no.35

Fleeceware on the Rise

Essex Police’s Fraud Alert System Newsletter no. 33

Fleeceware is a recently coined term that refers to mobile applications that come with excessive subscription fees, and in March over 200 such apps were discovered being advertised on the Google Play Store and Apple App Store.

The applications attract users with the promise of a free 3-day trial, but once the trial is
over, they are charged a recurring subscription fee – even if they have deleted the app –
until they cancel the subscription in their device’s app subscription settings. One app
offers a short free trial followed by a $66 (£47.73) per week subscription, potentially
costing the victim $3,432 (£2,482.19) per year unless cancelled. These fleeceware
applications are actively advertised on major social networks.

How to avoid Fleeceware apps:
• Be wary of free trials of less than a week – make sure you understand how much
you will be charged and that the app is worth the recurring fee.
• Be sceptical of viral adverts for apps – the adverts for fleeceware are likely to have
enticing messaging and images to attract users’ attention. They likely do not reflect
the actual functionality of the application.
• Read the small print – a closer look will likely reveal the true price of the app. Pay
close attention to the ‘In-app purchases’ section and be aware that even if it is a free
trial, as there may be automatic charges thereafter.
• Secure your payments – ensure that your payment methods are secured behind a
password or biometric check. This can also prevent accidental subscriptions by
children.

This information was provided via Essex Police’s Fraud Alert System Newsletter no.33

Catalytic Convertor Theft

Crime Prevention Advice
Crime Prevention Advice header image

Organised criminals can remove catalytic converters from under a vehicle in a matter of minutes. 

Catalytic converters contain precious metals such as rhodium, platinum and palladium which ‘clean’ exhaust gases. The sharp rise in the value of these metals over recent years has driven up the rate of catalytic converter theft. Palladium is currently more valuable than gold, meaning that a catalytic converter can sell for more than £500 on the black market.

If you have information on those behind catalytic converter theft, contact Crimestoppers 100% anonymously.

CALL Crimestoppers FREE ON 0800 555 111 OR REPORT ONLINE

Catalytic converter theft is a crime and leaves drivers with an average replacement bill of £1,300. In some cases, the vehicle may even be written off by the damage caused by thieves sawing converters from the exhaust. This crime can also cause immense stress and anxiety to victims, with some drivers being repeatedly targeted. 

If you are approached to buy catalytic converters which you suspect may be stolen, you can contact Crimestoppers 100% anonymously and tell them what you know. You don’t need to give your name, just as much information as you can give, such as the whereabouts of the criminals and who they are selling the metal to.

This information was provided via Crimestoppers’ newsletter

Solar Panel Scams

Essex Police’s Fraud Alert System Newsletter no.32

Essex has recently seen an increase in residents falling victim to rogue traders
mis-selling solar panels.

Criminals target the vulnerable and those who already have solar panels to offer
unnecessary maintenance contracts, extended warranties or battery replacements—all at
a high price. One ’customer’ in Rayleigh received forged paperwork, whereas most
receive none. Following the payment, no service is provided.

Residents have been contacted via the phone or by cold callers knocking at the door.
Contact out of the blue should always be treated as suspicious—don’t be rushed to make
a decision there and then.

Remember to Take Five:
STOP – Taking a moment to stop and think before parting with your money or
information could keep you safe.
CHALLENGE – Could it be fake? It’s ok to reject, refuse or ignore any requests.
Only criminals will try to rush or panic you.
PROTECT – Contact your bank immediately if you think you’ve fallen for a scam and
report it to Action Fraud

This information was provided in Essex Police’s Fraud Alerts System’s Newsletter no. 32